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Be as kind to yourself as you are to others. See your mistakes as opportunities to learn.

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shower
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Happiness is more than just a feeling; it is something we can all practise on a daily basis. But people are better at some happy habits than others. In fact, the one habit that corresponds most closely with us being satisfied with our lives overall — self-acceptance — is often the one we practise least.

5,000 people surveyed rated themselves between 1 and 10 on ten habits identified from the latest scientific research as being key to happiness.

Giving was the top habit revealed by those who took the survey. When asked about Giving (How often do you make an effort to help or be kind to others?) people scored an average of 7.41 out of 10, with one in six (17%) topping 10 out of 10. Just over one in three (36%) people scored 8 or 9; slightly fewer (32%) scored 6 or 7; and less than one in six (15%) rated themselves at 5 or less.

The Relating habit came a close second. The question How often do you put effort into the relationships that matter most to you? produced an average score of 7.36 out of 10. And 15% of people scored the maximum 10 out of 10.

The survey also revealed which habits are most closely related to people’s overall satisfaction with life. All 10 habits were found to be strongly linked to life satisfaction, with Acceptance found to be the habit that predicts it most strongly. Yet Acceptance was also revealed as the habit that people tend to practise the least, generating the lowest average score from the 5,000 respondents.

When answering the Acceptance question, How often are you kind to yourself and think you’re fine as you are? people’s average rating was just 5.56 out of 10. Only 5% of people put themselves at a 10 on the Acceptance habit. Around one in five people (19%) scored an 8 or 9; Less than a third (30%) scored a 6 or 7; and almost half (46%) of people rated themselves at 5 or less.

Treating our bodies to regular physical activity is another proven happy habit. Yet the survey revealed that this is another habit that often gets overlooked. The average answer to How often do you spend at least half an hour a day being active? was just 5.88 out of 10, with 45% of people rating themselves 5 or less.

Professor Karen Pine, a psychologist from the University of Hertfordshire and co-founder of Do Something Different, said: “Practising these habits really can boost our happiness. It’s great to see so many people regularly doing things to help others — and when we make others happy we tend to feel good ourselves too. This survey shows that practising self-acceptance is one thing that could make the biggest difference to many people’s happiness. Exercise is also known to lift mood so if people want a simple, daily way to fee happier they should get into the habit of being more physically active too.”

Dr Mark Williamson, Director of Action for Happiness, said: “Our society puts huge pressure on us to be successful and to constantly compare ourselves with others. This causes a great deal of unhappiness and anxiety. These findings remind us that if we can learn to be more accepting of ourselves as we really are, we’re likely to be much happier. The results also confirm us that our day-to-day habits have a much bigger impact on our happiness than we might imagine.”

To support participants who want to boost their happy habits, Do Something Different and Action for Happiness have also created a new Do Happiness programme, which sends people regular small positive actions (Do’s) to help them practice the habits that science shows tend to make people happy.
How can we practise the self-acceptance habit?

Here are three positive actions that people can take to increase their levels of self-acceptance:

  • Be as kind to yourself as you are to others. See your mistakes as opportunities to learn. Notice things you do well, however small
  • Ask a trusted friend or colleague to tell you what your strengths are or what they value about you
  • Spend some quiet time by yourself. Tune in to how you’re feeling inside and try to be at peace with who you are.

Where did the happy habits come from?

The happy habits included in the survey are based on the Ten Keys to Happier Living framework, developed by Action for Happiness based on an extensive review of the latest research about what really affects mental wellbeing. Together the Ten Keys spell the acronym GREAT DREAM, as follows:

  • Giving: do things for others
  • Relating: connect with people
  • Exercising: take care of your body
  • Appreciating: notice the world around
  • Trying out: keep learning new things
  • Direction: have goals to look forward to
  • Resilience: find ways to bounce back
  • Emotion: take a positive approach
  • Acceptance: be comfortable with who you are
  • Meaning: be part of something bigger

Key Survey Question Average score

Giving How often do you make an effort to help or be kind to others? 7.41
Relating How often do you put effort into the relationships that matter most to you? 7.36
Exercising How often do you spend at least half an hour a day being active? 5.88
Appreciating How often do you take time to notice the good things in your life? 6.57
Trying out How often do you learn or try new things? 6.26
Direction How often do you do things that contribute to your most important life goals? 6.08
Resilience How often do you find ways to bounce back quickly from problems? 6.33
Emotion How often do you do things that make you feel good? 6.74
Acceptance How often are you kind to yourself and think you’re fine as you are? 5.56
Meaning How often do you do things that give you a sense of meaning or purpose? 6.38

A final question posed was: Overall, how satisfied are you with your life nowadays?

The average score was 6.49, compared to a national average of 6.34 reported in the UK National Values survey 2013.

Source: Science Daily

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Posted by on October 14, 2015 in WISDOM

 

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Polyamory – Everything you ever wanted to know about open relationships

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Polyamory (from Greek πολ? [poly, meaning many or several] and Latin amor [love]) is the practice, desire, or acceptance of having more than one intimate relationship at a time with the knowledge and consent of everyone involved.

Polyamory, often abbreviated to poly, is sometimes described as consensual, ethical,or responsible non-monogamy. The word is occasionally used more broadly to refer to any sexual or romantic relationships that are not sexually exclusive, though there is disagreement on how broadly it applies; an emphasis on ethics, honesty, and transparency all around is widely regarded as the crucial defining characteristic.

“Polyamorous” can refer to the nature of a relationship at some point in time or to aphilosophy or relationship orientation (much like gender or sexual orientation). It is used as an umbrella term that covers various forms of multiple relationships; polyamorous arrangements are varied, reflecting the choices and philosophies of the individuals involved.

Polyamory may differ from polygamy, which means to have multiple spouses. Traditional polygamy is usually polygynous and involves one man taking on multiple female partners (though there are also traditional polyandrous societies in which one woman takes on multiple male partners). By contrast, polyamory does not limit any partner from taking on additional partners.

Polyamory is grounded in concepts such as gender equality, self-determination, free choice for all involved, mutual trust, equal respect among all partners, the intrinsic value of love, and the ideal of compersion. As of July 2009, there were estimated to be more than 500,000 polyamorous relationships in the United States.[1][2]

The defining characteristic of polyamory is belief in the possibility of, and value of, multiple romantic loving relationships carried out “with the knowledge and consent of all partners concerned.”[3] What distinguishes polyamory from traditional forms of non-monogamy (i.e. “cheating“) is an ideology that openness, goodwill, intense communication, and ethical behavior should prevail among all the parties involved. Powerful intimate bonding among three or more persons may occur. Some consider polyamory to be, at its root, the generalization of romantic couple-love beyond two people into something larger and more fundamental.[4][5]

People who identify as polyamorous typically reject the view that sexual and relational exclusivity are necessary for deep, committed long-term loving relationships. Those who are open to, or emotionally suited for, polyamorous relationships may be single or in monogamous relationships, but are often in multiple long term relationships involving at least three people.

In practice, polyamorous relationships are highly varied and individualized. Ideally they are built upon values of trustloyaltynegotiation, and compersion, as well as rejection of jealousy, possessiveness, and restrictive cultural standards.[6] Such relationships are often more fluid than the traditional “dating-and-marriage” model of long-term relationships, and the participants in a polyamorous relationship may not have preconceptions as to its duration.[citation needed] However, there are polyamorous relationships that last many years and some decades.

Sex is not necessarily a primary focus in polyamorous relationships. Polyamorous relationships commonly consist of people seeking to build long term relationships with more than one other person on mutually agreeable grounds, with sex as only one aspect of their relationship.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyamory

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Posted by on December 30, 2014 in WISDOM

 

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Treat people as if they are someone special and you will be amazed how you will make their day.

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THERE IS AN INHERENT DESIRE IN EVERYBODY TO BE SOMEONE. TO BE SEEN AS A PERSON OF SIGNIFICANCE!

 

Most of us have an inherent need to feel accepted and recognized by others. Even the most introvert and unassuming person want to feel that he or she is someone special for somebody. Go to any playground and watch toddlers in action. Observe what they do to get the attention of their fellow toddlers. They often, bribe, sulk and fight for the attention of other toddlers. They sometimes try and kiss, smile or talk their way into the heart of a fellow toddler. It sometimes happens that they feel that more dramatic and drastic attention arousal methods would have the desired results. A swift shot on the ear with a heavy toy often does the trick when more subtle methods failed.

 

People of all ages also do the most amazing things in an attempt to get recognition and acceptance. Just like the toddler example above they also often sulk, fight or cry for attention. I have seen men the size of mountains that become like marshmallows when they fall in love or when they want someone close to their heart to tell them that they mean something special to them. Most of us need to feel that we are someone special to the people that are linked to us in the game of life. We all still have a child in our heart that begs for recognition and attention. We often play-act that we are totally independent, but deep inside we yearn for recognition, acceptance and a feeling that we are special. Even the homeless people on the street want dignity and respect from society. They might be down on their luck, but deep inside under the layers of dirt they still yearn to be someone special.

 

If you want to exert strong influence on others you will have to keep this in mind. Treat people as if they are someone special and you will be amazed how you will make their day.

I WILL FROM TODAY TREAT EVERYBODY THAT I MEET WITH DIGNITY AND COMPASSION. I WILL LOOK BEYOND THE FACADES AND MASKS AND FIND THE REAL PERSON HIDDEN IN HIS MIND OR HEART!

 

All of us need some form of recognition and acceptance. We might have a history of failures and disasters, but deep inside the flame of being special to someone continues to flicker in the dark recesses of our minds. If you can understand this inherent need of people, you will select your words with much more care. You will take your own priorities out of the way for a while and rather focus on the dreams and aspirations of the people that share your journey on spaceship earth. Acceptance costs nothing and can be passed on with unbridled abundance. I have seen people that are seriously overweight that yearn for acceptance. They feel that they are a person with similar feelings like everybody else under the layers of fat. They cry for acceptance notwithstanding their problem, but are usually shunned by most people. They also want to feel special to others, but often bear the brunt of people with a warped sense of morality. I have seen the elderly treated like dirt by even their own family members. Because they have reached an advanced age does not mean that they are useless and stripped of their self-worth. You can become a motivator and exert a strong influence if you can learn to look underneath the surface and see if you can discover the real person hidden by his or her own history of fear and rejection. The old and the young seem to have one thing in common and that is the desire to feel that they are special to someone.

 

RENE

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Posted by on October 12, 2014 in WISDOM

 

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Happiness is more than just a feeling; it is something we can all practise on a daily basis.

.

disguise11.

.

Happiness is more than just a feeling; it is something we can all practise on a daily basis. But people are better at some happy habits than others. In fact, the one habit that corresponds most closely with us being satisfied with our lives overall — self-acceptance — is often the one we practise least.

5,000 people surveyed rated themselves between 1 and 10 on ten habits identified from the latest scientific research as being key to happiness.

Giving was the top habit revealed by those who took the survey. When asked about Giving (How often do you make an effort to help or be kind to others?) people scored an average of 7.41 out of 10, with one in six (17%) topping 10 out of 10. Just over one in three (36%) people scored 8 or 9; slightly fewer (32%) scored 6 or 7; and less than one in six (15%) rated themselves at 5 or less.

The Relating habit came a close second. The question How often do you put effort into the relationships that matter most to you? produced an average score of 7.36 out of 10. And 15% of people scored the maximum 10 out of 10.

The survey also revealed which habits are most closely related to people’s overall satisfaction with life. All 10 habits were found to be strongly linked to life satisfaction, with Acceptance found to be the habit that predicts it most strongly. Yet Acceptance was also revealed as the habit that people tend to practise the least, generating the lowest average score from the 5,000 respondents.

When answering the Acceptance question, How often are you kind to yourself and think you’re fine as you are? people’s average rating was just 5.56 out of 10. Only 5% of people put themselves at a 10 on the Acceptance habit. Around one in five people (19%) scored an 8 or 9; Less than a third (30%) scored a 6 or 7; and almost half (46%) of people rated themselves at 5 or less.

Treating our bodies to regular physical activity is another proven happy habit. Yet the survey revealed that this is another habit that often gets overlooked. The average answer to How often do you spend at least half an hour a day being active? was just 5.88 out of 10, with 45% of people rating themselves 5 or less.

Professor Karen Pine, a psychologist from the University of Hertfordshire and co-founder of Do Something Different, said: “Practising these habits really can boost our happiness. It’s great to see so many people regularly doing things to help others — and when we make others happy we tend to feel good ourselves too. This survey shows that practising self-acceptance is one thing that could make the biggest difference to many people’s happiness. Exercise is also known to lift mood so if people want a simple, daily way to fee happier they should get into the habit of being more physically active too.”

Dr Mark Williamson, Director of Action for Happiness, said: “Our society puts huge pressure on us to be successful and to constantly compare ourselves with others. This causes a great deal of unhappiness and anxiety. These findings remind us that if we can learn to be more accepting of ourselves as we really are, we’re likely to be much happier. The results also confirm us that our day-to-day habits have a much bigger impact on our happiness than we might imagine.”

To support participants who want to boost their happy habits, Do Something Different and Action for Happiness have also created a new Do Happiness programme, which sends people regular small positive actions (Do’s) to help them practice the habits that science shows tend to make people happy.
How can we practise the self-acceptance habit?

Here are three positive actions that people can take to increase their levels of self-acceptance:

  • Be as kind to yourself as you are to others. See your mistakes as opportunities to learn. Notice things you do well, however small
  • Ask a trusted friend or colleague to tell you what your strengths are or what they value about you
  • Spend some quiet time by yourself. Tune in to how you’re feeling inside and try to be at peace with who you are.

Where did the happy habits come from?

The happy habits included in the survey are based on the Ten Keys to Happier Living framework, developed by Action for Happiness based on an extensive review of the latest research about what really affects mental wellbeing. Together the Ten Keys spell the acronym GREAT DREAM, as follows:

  • Giving: do things for others
  • Relating: connect with people
  • Exercising: take care of your body
  • Appreciating: notice the world around
  • Trying out: keep learning new things
  • Direction: have goals to look forward to
  • Resilience: find ways to bounce back
  • Emotion: take a positive approach
  • Acceptance: be comfortable with who you are
  • Meaning: be part of something bigger

Key Survey Question Average score

Giving How often do you make an effort to help or be kind to others? 7.41
Relating How often do you put effort into the relationships that matter most to you? 7.36
Exercising How often do you spend at least half an hour a day being active? 5.88
Appreciating How often do you take time to notice the good things in your life? 6.57
Trying out How often do you learn or try new things? 6.26
Direction How often do you do things that contribute to your most important life goals? 6.08
Resilience How often do you find ways to bounce back quickly from problems? 6.33
Emotion How often do you do things that make you feel good? 6.74
Acceptance How often are you kind to yourself and think you’re fine as you are? 5.56
Meaning How often do you do things that give you a sense of meaning or purpose? 6.38

A final question posed was: Overall, how satisfied are you with your life nowadays?

The average score was 6.49, compared to a national average of 6.34 reported in the UK National Values survey 2013.

Source: Science Daily

.

 
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Posted by on October 7, 2014 in WISDOM

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

People of all ages sometimes do the most amazing things in an attempt to get recognition/acceptance.

.

 

THERE IS AN INHERENT DESIRE IN EVERYBODY TO BE SOMEONE. TO BE SEEN AS A PERSON OF SIGNIFICANCE!

 

Most of us have an inherent need to feel accepted and recognized by others. Even the most introvert and unassuming person want to feel that he or she is someone special for somebody. Go to any playground and watch toddlers in action. Observe what they do to get the attention of their fellow toddlers. They often, bribe, sulk and fight for the attention of other toddlers. They sometimes try and kiss, smile or talk their way into the heart of a fellow toddler. It sometimes happens that they feel that more dramatic and drastic attention arousal methods would have the desired results. A swift shot on the ear with a heavy toy often does the trick when more subtle methods failed.

 

People of all ages also do the most amazing things in an attempt to get recognition and acceptance. Just like the toddler example above they also often sulk, fight or cry for attention. I have seen men the size of mountains that become like marshmallows when they fall in love or when they want someone close to their heart to tell them that they mean something special to them. Most of us need to feel that we are someone special to the people that are linked to us in the game of life. We all still have a child in our heart that begs for recognition and attention. We often play-act that we are totally independent, but deep inside we yearn for recognition, acceptance and a feeling that we are special. Even the homeless people on the street want dignity and respect from society. They might be down on their luck, but deep inside under the layers of dirt they still yearn to be someone special.

 

If you want to exert strong influence on others you will have to keep this in mind. Treat people as if they are someone special and you will be amazed how you will make their day.

I WILL FROM TODAY TREAT EVERYBODY THAT I MEET WITH DIGNITY AND COMPASSION. I WILL LOOK BEYOND THE FACADES AND MASKS AND FIND THE REAL PERSON HIDDEN IN HIS MIND OR HEART!

 

All of us need some form of recognition and acceptance. We might have a history of failures and disasters, but deep inside the flame of being special to someone continues to flicker in the dark recesses of our minds. If you can understand this inherent need of people, you will select your words with much more care. You will take your own priorities out of the way for a while and rather focus on the dreams and aspirations of the people that share your journey on spaceship earth. Acceptance costs nothing and can be passed on with unbridled abundance. I have seen people that are seriously overweight that yearn for acceptance. They feel that they are a person with similar feelings like everybody else under the layers of fat. They cry for acceptance notwithstanding their problem, but are usually shunned by most people. They also want to feel special to others, but often bear the brunt of people with a warped sense of morality. I have seen the elderly treated like dirt by even their own family members. Because they have reached an advanced age does not mean that they are useless and stripped of their self-worth. You can become a motivator and exert a strong influence if you can learn to look underneath the surface and see if you can discover the real person hidden by his or her own history of fear and rejection. The old and the young seem to have one thing in common and that is the desire to feel that they are special to someone.

 

RENE

.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 16, 2014 in WISDOM

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Polyamory – Everything you ever wanted to know about open relationships

 

.

Polyamory (from Greek πολ? [poly, meaning many or several] and Latin amor [love]) is the practice, desire, or acceptance of having more than one intimate relationship at a time with the knowledge and consent of everyone involved.

Polyamory, often abbreviated to poly, is sometimes described as consensual, ethical,or responsible non-monogamy. The word is occasionally used more broadly to refer to any sexual or romantic relationships that are not sexually exclusive, though there is disagreement on how broadly it applies; an emphasis on ethics, honesty, and transparency all around is widely regarded as the crucial defining characteristic.

“Polyamorous” can refer to the nature of a relationship at some point in time or to aphilosophy or relationship orientation (much like gender or sexual orientation). It is used as an umbrella term that covers various forms of multiple relationships; polyamorous arrangements are varied, reflecting the choices and philosophies of the individuals involved.

Polyamory may differ from polygamy, which means to have multiple spouses. Traditional polygamy is usually polygynous and involves one man taking on multiple female partners (though there are also traditional polyandrous societies in which one woman takes on multiple male partners). By contrast, polyamory does not limit any partner from taking on additional partners.

Polyamory is grounded in concepts such as gender equality, self-determination, free choice for all involved, mutual trust, equal respect among all partners, the intrinsic value of love, and the ideal of compersion. As of July 2009, there were estimated to be more than 500,000 polyamorous relationships in the United States.[1][2]

The defining characteristic of polyamory is belief in the possibility of, and value of, multiple romantic loving relationships carried out “with the knowledge and consent of all partners concerned.”[3] What distinguishes polyamory from traditional forms of non-monogamy (i.e. “cheating“) is an ideology that openness, goodwill, intense communication, and ethical behavior should prevail among all the parties involved. Powerful intimate bonding among three or more persons may occur. Some consider polyamory to be, at its root, the generalization of romantic couple-love beyond two people into something larger and more fundamental.[4][5]

People who identify as polyamorous typically reject the view that sexual and relational exclusivity are necessary for deep, committed long-term loving relationships. Those who are open to, or emotionally suited for, polyamorous relationships may be single or in monogamous relationships, but are often in multiple long term relationships involving at least three people.

In practice, polyamorous relationships are highly varied and individualized. Ideally they are built upon values of trustloyaltynegotiation, and compersion, as well as rejection of jealousy, possessiveness, and restrictive cultural standards.[6] Such relationships are often more fluid than the traditional “dating-and-marriage” model of long-term relationships, and the participants in a polyamorous relationship may not have preconceptions as to its duration.[citation needed] However, there are polyamorous relationships that last many years and some decades.

Sex is not necessarily a primary focus in polyamorous relationships. Polyamorous relationships commonly consist of people seeking to build long term relationships with more than one other person on mutually agreeable grounds, with sex as only one aspect of their relationship.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyamory

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Posted by on June 2, 2014 in WISDOM

 

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Happiness is more than just a feeling: Self-Acceptance is the Key to Happiness

disguise11.

Happiness is more than just a feeling; it is something we can all practise on a daily basis. But people are better at some happy habits than others. In fact, the one habit that corresponds most closely with us being satisfied with our lives overall — self-acceptance — is often the one we practise least.

5,000 people surveyed rated themselves between 1 and 10 on ten habits identified from the latest scientific research as being key to happiness.

Giving was the top habit revealed by those who took the survey. When asked about Giving (How often do you make an effort to help or be kind to others?) people scored an average of 7.41 out of 10, with one in six (17%) topping 10 out of 10. Just over one in three (36%) people scored 8 or 9; slightly fewer (32%) scored 6 or 7; and less than one in six (15%) rated themselves at 5 or less.

The Relating habit came a close second. The question How often do you put effort into the relationships that matter most to you? produced an average score of 7.36 out of 10. And 15% of people scored the maximum 10 out of 10.

The survey also revealed which habits are most closely related to people’s overall satisfaction with life. All 10 habits were found to be strongly linked to life satisfaction, with Acceptance found to be the habit that predicts it most strongly. Yet Acceptance was also revealed as the habit that people tend to practise the least, generating the lowest average score from the 5,000 respondents.

When answering the Acceptance question, How often are you kind to yourself and think you’re fine as you are? people’s average rating was just 5.56 out of 10. Only 5% of people put themselves at a 10 on the Acceptance habit. Around one in five people (19%) scored an 8 or 9; Less than a third (30%) scored a 6 or 7; and almost half (46%) of people rated themselves at 5 or less.

Treating our bodies to regular physical activity is another proven happy habit. Yet the survey revealed that this is another habit that often gets overlooked. The average answer to How often do you spend at least half an hour a day being active? was just 5.88 out of 10, with 45% of people rating themselves 5 or less.

Professor Karen Pine, a psychologist from the University of Hertfordshire and co-founder of Do Something Different, said: “Practising these habits really can boost our happiness. It’s great to see so many people regularly doing things to help others — and when we make others happy we tend to feel good ourselves too. This survey shows that practising self-acceptance is one thing that could make the biggest difference to many people’s happiness. Exercise is also known to lift mood so if people want a simple, daily way to fee happier they should get into the habit of being more physically active too.”

Dr Mark Williamson, Director of Action for Happiness, said: “Our society puts huge pressure on us to be successful and to constantly compare ourselves with others. This causes a great deal of unhappiness and anxiety. These findings remind us that if we can learn to be more accepting of ourselves as we really are, we’re likely to be much happier. The results also confirm us that our day-to-day habits have a much bigger impact on our happiness than we might imagine.”

To support participants who want to boost their happy habits, Do Something Different and Action for Happiness have also created a new Do Happiness programme, which sends people regular small positive actions (Do’s) to help them practice the habits that science shows tend to make people happy.
How can we practise the self-acceptance habit?

Here are three positive actions that people can take to increase their levels of self-acceptance:

  • Be as kind to yourself as you are to others. See your mistakes as opportunities to learn. Notice things you do well, however small
  • Ask a trusted friend or colleague to tell you what your strengths are or what they value about you
  • Spend some quiet time by yourself. Tune in to how you’re feeling inside and try to be at peace with who you are.

Where did the happy habits come from?

The happy habits included in the survey are based on the Ten Keys to Happier Living framework, developed by Action for Happiness based on an extensive review of the latest research about what really affects mental wellbeing. Together the Ten Keys spell the acronym GREAT DREAM, as follows:

  • Giving: do things for others
  • Relating: connect with people
  • Exercising: take care of your body
  • Appreciating: notice the world around
  • Trying out: keep learning new things
  • Direction: have goals to look forward to
  • Resilience: find ways to bounce back
  • Emotion: take a positive approach
  • Acceptance: be comfortable with who you are
  • Meaning: be part of something bigger

Key Survey Question Average score

Giving How often do you make an effort to help or be kind to others? 7.41
Relating How often do you put effort into the relationships that matter most to you? 7.36
Exercising How often do you spend at least half an hour a day being active? 5.88
Appreciating How often do you take time to notice the good things in your life? 6.57
Trying out How often do you learn or try new things? 6.26
Direction How often do you do things that contribute to your most important life goals? 6.08
Resilience How often do you find ways to bounce back quickly from problems? 6.33
Emotion How often do you do things that make you feel good? 6.74
Acceptance How often are you kind to yourself and think you’re fine as you are? 5.56
Meaning How often do you do things that give you a sense of meaning or purpose? 6.38

A final question posed was: Overall, how satisfied are you with your life nowadays?

The average score was 6.49, compared to a national average of 6.34 reported in the UK National Values survey 2013.

Source: Science Daily

 
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Posted by on March 17, 2014 in WISDOM

 

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