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Happy people have an advantage. They are often healthier and live longer.

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Happy people have an advantage over unhappy ones — they may be healthier and may live longer.

 

An extensive review of literature using seven types of evidence indicates that high subjective well-being (SWB), such as life satisfaction, optimism, and positive emotions, causes better health and longevity. The review, published in Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being (2011), examined 160 studies which showed compelling evidence that positive feelings predict health and longevity.

 

The findings of the review, based from seven types of evidence, are summarized below:

Longitudinal studies. These studies, which have large sample sizes and have followed participants for a decade or more, revealed that SWB was related to lower mortality rate in both healthy and diseased populations. Positive moods such as joy and happiness, life satisfaction, hopefulness, optimism, and a sense of humor were associated with reduced risk of mortality and predicted longevity.

 

Physiology and health. Moods and emotions are associated with biological markers such as blood pressure, cortisol, and inflammation. Studies found that pessimists have higher blood pressure levels. Anger and hostility were related not only to the development of cardiovascular disease, but also to disease progression and inflammation. Stress predicted lower levels of immune response; whereas, positive affect strengthened immunity. Positive affect was associated with greater social connectedness, perceived social support, and greater probability of performing healthy behaviors.

 

Experimental manipulations of emotions. In experimental studies, positive and negative moods are induced which are then measured. Research showed that participants exposed to positive mood induction had quicker cardiovascular recovery after a stressful task than subjects who were exposed to neutral and negative mood inductions. Studies also revealed that couples who were generally higher in hostility had slower wound healing than low hostile couples, as well as more tumor necrosis and a poorer immune response.

 

Animal studies. Animals are used in experimental research to obtain information about how certain positive and negative situations affect their health and longevity. Studies revealed that socially-stressed monkeys developed more extensive atherosclerosis than unstressed ones. Stress, threatening human behavior, and isolation suppressed the immune system of monkeys, chickens, and pigs. Pigs that learned a mastery task to obtain rewards, giving them some control over their environment, later showed quicker wound healing and carcass quality.

 

Quasi-experimental studies in natural settings. Studies in quasi-experimental studies suggest that events and disasters are associated with cardiovascular and immune changes. Disasters, bereavement, and observing exciting sports events can trigger cardiac deaths in vulnerable individuals. Further, people with work overload and worry showed higher cortisol response at awakening and on weekdays but not on weekends.

 

Interventions that influence SWB. Researchers found that transcendental meditation and progressive relaxation reduced blood pressure over a 3-month follow-up period, compared to a control group. People who wrote about intensely positive experiences had fewer health center visits for illness during the following 3 months, compared to people who wrote about a control topic. Patients who suffered from myocardial infarction, who received Type-A counseling (for Type A behavior) in addition to traditional cardiac counseling, were less likely to die within 5 years.

 

SW’s impact on quality of life and pain. Studies showed that positive emotions were related to lower pain and greater tolerance for pain. Patients suffering from fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis reported less pain with positive mood induction while women reported less pain to heat stimuli when looking at photos of their partner.

 

In sum, these converging studies form a compelling proof that SWB, such as happiness, causally influences health and longevity.

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By Amy Chaves, Ph.D. / Source: Natural News

 

 

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1 Comment

Posted by on September 21, 2015 in WISDOM

 

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Happy people have an advantage/unhappy ones — they may be healthier/may live longer.

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Happy people have an advantage over unhappy ones — they may be healthier and may live longer.

 

An extensive review of literature using seven types of evidence indicates that high subjective well-being (SWB), such as life satisfaction, optimism, and positive emotions, causes better health and longevity. The review, published in Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being (2011), examined 160 studies which showed compelling evidence that positive feelings predict health and longevity.

 

The findings of the review, based from seven types of evidence, are summarized below:

Longitudinal studies. These studies, which have large sample sizes and have followed participants for a decade or more, revealed that SWB was related to lower mortality rate in both healthy and diseased populations. Positive moods such as joy and happiness, life satisfaction, hopefulness, optimism, and a sense of humor were associated with reduced risk of mortality and predicted longevity.

 

Physiology and health. Moods and emotions are associated with biological markers such as blood pressure, cortisol, and inflammation. Studies found that pessimists have higher blood pressure levels. Anger and hostility were related not only to the development of cardiovascular disease, but also to disease progression and inflammation. Stress predicted lower levels of immune response; whereas, positive affect strengthened immunity. Positive affect was associated with greater social connectedness, perceived social support, and greater probability of performing healthy behaviors.

 

Experimental manipulations of emotions. In experimental studies, positive and negative moods are induced which are then measured. Research showed that participants exposed to positive mood induction had quicker cardiovascular recovery after a stressful task than subjects who were exposed to neutral and negative mood inductions. Studies also revealed that couples who were generally higher in hostility had slower wound healing than low hostile couples, as well as more tumor necrosis and a poorer immune response.

 

Animal studies. Animals are used in experimental research to obtain information about how certain positive and negative situations affect their health and longevity. Studies revealed that socially-stressed monkeys developed more extensive atherosclerosis than unstressed ones. Stress, threatening human behavior, and isolation suppressed the immune system of monkeys, chickens, and pigs. Pigs that learned a mastery task to obtain rewards, giving them some control over their environment, later showed quicker wound healing and carcass quality.

 

Quasi-experimental studies in natural settings. Studies in quasi-experimental studies suggest that events and disasters are associated with cardiovascular and immune changes. Disasters, bereavement, and observing exciting sports events can trigger cardiac deaths in vulnerable individuals. Further, people with work overload and worry showed higher cortisol response at awakening and on weekdays but not on weekends.

 

Interventions that influence SWB. Researchers found that transcendental meditation and progressive relaxation reduced blood pressure over a 3-month follow-up period, compared to a control group. People who wrote about intensely positive experiences had fewer health center visits for illness during the following 3 months, compared to people who wrote about a control topic. Patients who suffered from myocardial infarction, who received Type-A counseling (for Type A behavior) in addition to traditional cardiac counseling, were less likely to die within 5 years.

 

SW’s impact on quality of life and pain. Studies showed that positive emotions were related to lower pain and greater tolerance for pain. Patients suffering from fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis reported less pain with positive mood induction while women reported less pain to heat stimuli when looking at photos of their partner.

 

In sum, these converging studies form a compelling proof that SWB, such as happiness, causally influences health and longevity.

By Amy Chaves, Ph.D. / Source: Natural News

 

 

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Posted by on April 4, 2015 in WISDOM

 

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Happy people have an advantage.

.

Happy people have an advantage over unhappy ones — they may be healthier and may live longer.

 

An extensive review of literature using seven types of evidence indicates that high subjective well-being (SWB), such as life satisfaction, optimism, and positive emotions, causes better health and longevity. The review, published in Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being (2011), examined 160 studies which showed compelling evidence that positive feelings predict health and longevity.

 

The findings of the review, based from seven types of evidence, are summarized below:

Longitudinal studies. These studies, which have large sample sizes and have followed participants for a decade or more, revealed that SWB was related to lower mortality rate in both healthy and diseased populations. Positive moods such as joy and happiness, life satisfaction, hopefulness, optimism, and a sense of humor were associated with reduced risk of mortality and predicted longevity.

 

Physiology and health. Moods and emotions are associated with biological markers such as blood pressure, cortisol, and inflammation. Studies found that pessimists have higher blood pressure levels. Anger and hostility were related not only to the development of cardiovascular disease, but also to disease progression and inflammation. Stress predicted lower levels of immune response; whereas, positive affect strengthened immunity. Positive affect was associated with greater social connectedness, perceived social support, and greater probability of performing healthy behaviors.

 

Experimental manipulations of emotions. In experimental studies, positive and negative moods are induced which are then measured. Research showed that participants exposed to positive mood induction had quicker cardiovascular recovery after a stressful task than subjects who were exposed to neutral and negative mood inductions. Studies also revealed that couples who were generally higher in hostility had slower wound healing than low hostile couples, as well as more tumor necrosis and a poorer immune response.

 

Animal studies. Animals are used in experimental research to obtain information about how certain positive and negative situations affect their health and longevity. Studies revealed that socially-stressed monkeys developed more extensive atherosclerosis than unstressed ones. Stress, threatening human behavior, and isolation suppressed the immune system of monkeys, chickens, and pigs. Pigs that learned a mastery task to obtain rewards, giving them some control over their environment, later showed quicker wound healing and carcass quality.

 

Quasi-experimental studies in natural settings. Studies in quasi-experimental studies suggest that events and disasters are associated with cardiovascular and immune changes. Disasters, bereavement, and observing exciting sports events can trigger cardiac deaths in vulnerable individuals. Further, people with work overload and worry showed higher cortisol response at awakening and on weekdays but not on weekends.

 

Interventions that influence SWB. Researchers found that transcendental meditation and progressive relaxation reduced blood pressure over a 3-month follow-up period, compared to a control group. People who wrote about intensely positive experiences had fewer health center visits for illness during the following 3 months, compared to people who wrote about a control topic. Patients who suffered from myocardial infarction, who received Type-A counseling (for Type A behavior) in addition to traditional cardiac counseling, were less likely to die within 5 years.

 

SW’s impact on quality of life and pain. Studies showed that positive emotions were related to lower pain and greater tolerance for pain. Patients suffering from fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis reported less pain with positive mood induction while women reported less pain to heat stimuli when looking at photos of their partner.

 

In sum, these converging studies form a compelling proof that SWB, such as happiness, causally influences health and longevity.

By Amy Chaves, Ph.D. / Source: Natural News

 

 

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Posted by on February 18, 2015 in WISDOM

 

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We don’t stop laughing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop laughing!

Laughter

We don’t stop laughing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop laughing!

 

Enjoyment

 

Laughter has beneficial affects on our bodies. Parts of our brain are stimulated by laughter. When we laugh dopamine is released into the ‘pleasure center’ of the brain causing pleasure. In addition, laughter stimulates the release of other feel-good substances, including endorphins, which are opiates (sedative narcotics) capable of relieving pain. Laughter protects one’s sanity too, due to its ability to release stress and ease tension.

 

Health benefits

Research shows that laughter and a sense of humor have an effect on longevity and quality of life. Laughter activates the chemistry of the will to live and increases our capacity to fight disease. Laughing relaxes the body and reduces problems associated with high blood pressure, strokes, arthritis, and ulcers. Some research suggests that laughter may also reduce the risk of heart disease. Historically, research has shown that distressing emotions (depression, anger, anxiety, and stress) are all related to heart disease. A study done at the University of Maryland Medical Center suggests that a good sense of humor and the ability to laugh at stressful situations helps reduce the damaging physical effects of distressing emotions.

 

Some of the health benefits include:

 

  • Reduces risk of heart disease by expanding the inner walls of arteries increasing the blood flow.
  • The relaxing effect after a good laugh helps bring down blood pressure.
  • Laughing is a natural painkiller. Studies validate the pain relieving effects of good laughter.
  • Belly laughing massages abdominal organs, increasing blood flow & improves their function.
  • Laughing is one of the most effective ways to reduce effects of stress; instantly reduces stress hormone levels.
  • A good belly laugh exercises the diaphragm, contracts the abs and even works out the shoulders.
  • Helps control diabetes. Study: people who watched a funny video after meal had comparatively lower blood sugar levels than those who watched a serious video.
  • Laughing makes you look younger. It takes up to 15 muscles to squeeze facial muscles into a smile. Smiling increases blood flow in your face making you look younger.
  • Laughter improves your breathing. It empties your lungs of more air than it takes in, resulting in a cleansing effect, similar to deep breathing.
  • Laughing boosts your immune system: It increases the number of T-cells and antibody-producing cells.
  • Laughter is an effective anti-depressant: Laughter keeps depression and anxiety away by boosting the production of serotonin, a natural anti-depressant.
  • Improves sleep. A good laugh before sleep reduces stress and anxiety, promoting deep, restful sleep.
  • Laughter gives psychological benefits: It boosts self-confidence and gives mental strength to cope with conflicts and challenges in life.
  • Laughter is contagious: It not only lifts our spirits, but also the spirit of others around us.
  • Boosts your relationship: A shared sense of humor will help keep your relationship running smoothly.
  • Laughing helps burn calories. A hearty laugh raises the heart rate and speeds up the metabolism.

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Posted by on November 14, 2014 in WISDOM

 

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Laughter – Boosts your relationship and help keep your relationship running smoothly.

.

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Laughter

 

We don’t stop laughing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop laughing!

 

Enjoyment

 

Laughter has beneficial affects on our bodies. Parts of our brain are stimulated by laughter. When we laugh dopamine is released into the ‘pleasure center’ of the brain causing pleasure. In addition, laughter stimulates the release of other feel-good substances, including endorphins, which are opiates (sedative narcotics) capable of relieving pain. Laughter protects one’s sanity too, due to its ability to release stress and ease tension.

Health benefits

Research shows that laughter and a sense of humor have an effect on longevity and quality of life. Laughter activates the chemistry of the will to live and increases our capacity to fight disease. Laughing relaxes the body and reduces problems associated with high blood pressure, strokes, arthritis, and ulcers. Some research suggests that laughter may also reduce the risk of heart disease. Historically, research has shown that distressing emotions (depression, anger, anxiety, and stress) are all related to heart disease. A study done at the University of Maryland Medical Center suggests that a good sense of humor and the ability to laugh at stressful situations helps reduce the damaging physical effects of distressing emotions.

 

Some of the health benefits include:

 

  • Reduces risk of heart disease by expanding the inner walls of arteries increasing the blood flow.

  • The relaxing effect after a good laugh helps bring down blood pressure.

  • Laughing is a natural painkiller. Studies validate the pain relieving effects of good laughter.

  • Belly laughing massages abdominal organs, increasing blood flow & improves their function.

  • Laughing is one of the most effective ways to reduce effects of stress; instantly reduces stress hormone levels.

  • A good belly laugh exercises the diaphragm, contracts the abs and even works out the shoulders.

  • Helps control diabetes. Study: people who watched a funny video after meal had comparatively lower blood sugar levels than those who watched a serious video.

  • Laughing makes you look younger. It takes up to 15 muscles to squeeze facial muscles into a smile. Smiling increases blood flow in your face making you look younger.

  • Laughter improves your breathing. It empties your lungs of more air than it takes in, resulting in a cleansing effect, similar to deep breathing.

  • Laughing boosts your immune system: It increases the number of T-cells and antibody-producing cells.

  • Laughter is an effective anti-depressant: Laughter keeps depression and anxiety away by boosting the production of serotonin, a natural anti-depressant.

  • Improves sleep. A good laugh before sleep reduces stress and anxiety, promoting deep, restful sleep.

  • Laughter gives psychological benefits: It boosts self-confidence and gives mental strength to cope with conflicts and challenges in life.

  • Laughter is contagious: It not only lifts our spirits, but also the spirit of others around us.

  • Boosts your relationship: A shared sense of humor will help keep your relationship running smoothly.

  • Laughing helps burn calories. A hearty laugh raises the heart rate and speeds up the metabolism.

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Posted by on October 21, 2014 in WISDOM

 

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Laughter Works Better Than Drugs.

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glassespink

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It’s no secret that laughter is good for you and, even when indulged in liberally, is gloriously free of side effects.

Laughter is a simple stress reducer, a kind of natural Valium, but is also allows us to connect to other people in such unique ways, that it cannot be duplicated through any other method. A body of evidence shows that laughing not only works better than medication, but stimulates hormonal levels in ways similar to exercise.

One pioneer in laughter research, William Fry, claimed it took ten minutes on a rowing machine for his heart rate to reach the level it would after just one minute of hearty laughter. He wasn’t kidding. There is no doubt that laughter improves health.

Norman Cousins first suggested the idea that humor and the associated laughter can benefit a person’s health in the 1970s. His ground-breaking work, as a layperson diagnosed with an autoimmune disease, documented his use of laughter in treating himself — with medical approval and oversight — into remission. He published his personal research results in the New England Journal of Medicine and is considered one of the original architects of mind-body medicine.

Dr. Lee S. Berk, a preventive care specialist and psychoneuroimmunology researcher at Loma Linda University’s Schools of Allied Health (SAHP) and Medicine, and director of the molecular research lab at SAHP, Loma Linda, CA, and Dr. Stanley Tan have picked up where Cousins left off. Since the 1980s, they have been studying the human body’s response to mirthful laughter and have found that laughter helps optimize many of the functions of various body systems.

Berk and his colleagues were the first to establish that laughter helps optimize the hormones in the endocrine system, including decreasing the levels of cortisol and epinephrine, which lead to stress reduction. They have also shown that laughter has a positive effect on modulating components of the immune system, including increased production of antibodies and activation of the body’s protective cells, including T-cells and especially Natural Killer cells’ killing activity of tumor cells.

Their studies have shown that repetitious “mirthful laughter,” causes the body to respond in a way similar to moderate physical exercise. Laughter enhances your mood, decreases stress hormones, enhances immune activity, lowers bad cholesterol and systolic blood pressure, and raises good cholesterol (HDL).

As Berk explains, “We are finally starting to realize that our everyday behaviors and emotions are modulating our bodies in many ways.” His latest research expands the role of laughter even further.

Better Than Pharmaceuticals

The physiological study of laughter has a name –gelotology, and that there are actually researchers who study humor and laughter and how they have an impact on the brain.

Consider a recent study at Loma Linda University, which involved diabetic patients who had high cholesterol and high blood pressure. One group of participants received standard pharmaceutical treatment for these conditions…a second group was instructed to “view self-selected humor” (for instance, watch sitcoms or videos that they considered funny) for 30 minutes daily. After one year: In the laughter group, HDL (good) cholesterol increased by 26% and blood levels of C-reactive protein (a marker of inflammation) decreased by 66%, on average…in the other group, HDL increased by just 3% and C-reactive protein declined by just 26%, on average. “We are finding to a certain extent that laughter exceeds many of the physiological benefits of several medications,” said Dr. Ramond Jeffrey.

In another study, 14 healthy volunteers were recruited to a three-week study to examine the effects that laughter and distress have on modulating the key hormones that control appetite. During the study, each subject was required to watch one 20-minute video at random that was either upsetting (distress) or humorous (eustress) in nature.

When the researchers compared the hormone levels pre- and post-viewing, they found that the volunteers who watched the distressing video showed no statistically significant change in their appetite hormone levels during the 20-minutes they spent watching the video.

In contrast, the subjects who watched the humorous video had changes in blood pressure and also changes in the leptin and ghrelin levels.

Specifically, the level of leptin decreased as the level of ghrelin increased, much like the acute effect of moderate physical exercise that is often associated with increased appetite.

Michael Miller of the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore studied the effects of laughter on the blood vessels ability to expand — known as vasodilation. Poor vasodilation can increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes by making the passageways prone to being blocked, cutting off vital blood flow.

The researchers asked 20 healthy men and women to watch clips of two movies — either the violent opening battle scene in the 1998 film “Saving Private Ryan” or a humorous scene from a comedy, such as the 1996 “Kingpin.”

The researchers tested the subjects’ vasodilation, before and after the movie, by constricting and releasing an artery in their arms with a blood pressure cuff and then using ultrasound to measure how the blood vessels were functioning.

Overall, blood flow decreased by about 35 percent after experiencing stress but increased 22 percent after laughter — an improvement equivalent to that produced by a 15- to 30-minute workout.

“These kinds of results are impossible to replicate with drug therapy,” said Professor Tracy Stevenson. “We haven’t seen any pharmaceutical drug capable of reproducing the incredible health promoting effects seen from subjects who simply laugh daily,” she stated.

Brain Rewards Us for Laughing

Humor is no laughing matter, according to Dr. Allan L. Reiss of Stanford University in California.

“Humor has significant ramifications for our psychological and physical health,” he stated. Our sense of humor, he said, “often dictates if, how and with whom we establish friendships and even long-lasting romantic relationships.” Humor is also a “universal coping mechanism” for dealing with stress, Reiss added.

The Stanford researcher noted that most people are drawn to humor and that it makes people feel good. “We seem to feel rewarded” by humor, he said.

Researchers found that when a cartoon made a person laugh, a brain network that is known to be involved in reward was activated. In fact, the areas activated by humor have been shown previously to be activated by amphetamines and cocaine, according to a report in the the journal Neuron.

“We believe that utilizing studies such as this may be one way to more specifically identify individuals at risk for depressive disorders,” Reiss said. The research may also be useful in measuring a person’s response to treatment for depression, according to Reiss. The humor reward system in the brain may come “on line” even before symptoms of depression change, he said.

The research may also help explain “humorless” people, who, Reiss noted, may have serious problems in relationships.

4 Ways Laughter Improves Our Health

1) Blood flow. Researchers at the University of Maryland showed us that there are clear effects on blood vessels when people were shown either comedies or dramas. After the screening, the blood vessels of the group who watched the comedy behaved normally — expanding and contracting easily. But the blood vessels in people who watched the drama tended to tense up, restricting blood flow.

2) Immune response. Increased stress is associated with decreased immune system response. Some studies have shown that the ability to use humor may raise the level of infection-fighting antibodies in the body and boost the levels of immune cells, as well.

3) Blood sugar levels. One study of 19 people with diabetes looked at the effects of laughter on blood sugar levels. After eating, the group attended a tedious lecture. On the next day, the group ate the same meal and then watched a comedy. After the comedy, the group had lower blood sugar levels than they did after the lecture.

4) Relaxation and sleep. The focus on the benefits of laughter really began with Norman Cousin’s memoir, Anatomy of an Illness. Cousins, who was diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis, a painful spine condition, found that a diet of comedies, like Marx Brothers films and episodes of Candid Camera, helped him feel better. He said that ten minutes of laughter allowed him two hours of pain-free sleep.

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By Mae Chan

Source: PreventDisease.com

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2 Comments

Posted by on October 19, 2014 in WISDOM

 

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8 Things You Do Everyday That Will Kill You Dead

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The world is a dangerous place. Ever day thousands of people are killed by car wrecks, war, earthquakes, tsunamis, and boring celebrity gossip shows. But there are also plenty of things that we do every day that put us at risk or nudge us just slightly closer to death. Why do we continue to do dangerous stuff that we know shortens our life span? Because we are a brilliant, rational, logical species that always acts smart, that’s why. And in case you weren’t aware, we will help educate you on the shit you do every day that’s gonna kill you, so hopefully you will stop doing it, and continue to come back to COED.

1. Sitting on the couch – That’s right: not exercising can give you cancer. Exercising for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week will greatly reduce your risk of cancer, not to mention all the other illnesses associated with being over weight, out of shape, and a generally unattractive slob. So get out there and walk for 30 minutes, because it doesn’t even have to be that strenuous! Plus, regular exercise greatly improves mood as well.

2. Eating crap – This one may actually be a greater danger than smoking, as the related illnesses are numerous and compounding: heart disease, diabetes, cholesterol, blood pressure, strokes, and cancer. 61% of Americans are overweight and a full 25% are clinically obese, and of these, 300,000 die each year, simply from being fat. It aint pretty.

3. Drinking – There is much confusion concerning the health effects of drinking, as numerous studies have shown that daily alcohol consumption can improve health. The critical piece that is often overlooked is that the rate of consumption is minor: at most 2 glasses per day. Anything beyond that and alcohol greatly worsens whatever condition it might have helped. Liver disease, high blood pressure, and accidents resulting from incredibly stupid drunken behavior are the main causes of alcohol related deaths, of which there are 100,000 in the U.S.

4. Driving like an idiot/teenager – We were all teenagers at one point and we were all susceptible to the flawed judgement characteristic of the age. Some people grow out of it, and others do not. Continuing to act like an adolescent male who is attempting to assert Alpha-male dominance and impress the females is recipe for a firey death. Unfortunately, the driver isn’t the only one at risk, which makes this especially dangerous. More than 100 people die every single day in car accidents in the U.S. Don’t be an idiot.

5. Smoking – Everybody knows smoking is bad for you. The days when tobacco companies attempted to convince us that cigarettes were safe are long gone, and yet, a significant portion of the world continues to suck on those deadly little sticks (which, coincidentally, also make you smell really bad, thus lowering the chance of matting and producing off spring). The commonly accepted mortality rate of cigarettes is 33%. That means if smoke, you have a 1 in 3 chance of dying young from smoking related illness. That adds up to almost 450,000 Americans each year.

6. Hang around people who smoke – Yah, you don’t even have to smoke yourself to be treated to the feast of smoking related diseases: 50,000 Americans die each year from second-hand smoke. So don’t feel bad by asking somebody to not smoke, or to leave if somebody is. Killing themselves is one thing, killing you is just plain insulting.

7. Tanning – over a million Americans are diagnosed with skin cancer every year. Ironically, many of these people go to tanning booths rather than sitting out in the sun, thinking the tanning booths are safer. Wrong wrong wrong: UVA rays from tanning booths are two to three times more powerful than UVA rays from the sun. More than 10,000 Americans die every year from skin cancer. And they look a lot older than they really are when they do, too, because UV exposure destroys your skin, making it leathery and ugly. Oh the irony.

8. Pissing off a gun owner – It’s not guns that kill people, people kill people, right? Sure. But guns make it a whole lot easier. in 2007 there were almost 17,000 murders, but over 12,000 of those were via firearm. And yes, those 12,000 murdered by guns may have been assaulted with some other form of weapon if a gun wasn’t handy, but the fact is that guns have a higher fatality rate than any other weapon. Why else would gun owners, cops, the military etc carry guns? Because they are very effective at killing, that’s why. And the best estimate is that there are over 350 million guns in the US, so be nice. You never know who is packing.

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http://coedmagazine.com/author/lanceivar/

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Posted by on September 29, 2014 in WISDOM

 

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