RSS

Tag Archives: tips

Resilience is one of the greatest survival skills – 8 tips to help you learn how to bounce back.

.

Fall down seven times. Stand up eight. (Japanese proverb.)

 

Resilience is one of the greatest survival skills. It helps you both psychologically and physically in the long-run. While it can’t make your problems go away, it can help you endure any sort of hardship – like traumatic events, loss, illness, disaster, the death of a loved one, or any other setback or challenge.

Resilience is about enlisting your inner strengths, and harnessing your healthy coping mechanisms, so that you keep functioning without getting over-anxious, depressed, overwhelmed or apathetic.

Here are 8 tips to help you learn how to bounce back when some misfortune strikes, or when you are faced with a challenge:

Maintain your hopefulness. Even though the picture may look grim for now, think back to all the challenges that you have encountered and overcome in your life so far, to gain hope and optimism that a solution will be found and remember that any wound, no matter how big it seems right now, will heal in time.

Learn to be more stoical about life. Accept that unwanted events, sudden changes in circumstances are a part of life, and instead of clinging to your belief of how things “ought to be” learn to adapt, tolerate and even welcome your problems. Sometimes, problems are teachers and help us grow and become hardier and wiser.

Take some distance from the event, misfortune or challenge and try to view it as happening to someone else. How would you help that person cope? What would you advise him/her to do? Follow your own advice. There are many angles from which you can view a situation. Taking some distance, becoming an observer rather than a participant may give you the strength but also the problem-solving resources to overcome your challenge. Resilience requires flexibility, not holding onto rigidly to only one point of view.

Reach out to your friends or other support groups. You don’t have to go it alone. A friend’s advice, help or even willing ear or shoulder to cry on may help you re-organize better your inner resources. Feeling connected helps empower people in times of hardship. Offering help to others does the same. Help others in need, you will get empowered as much as they!

Take appropriate action.You don’t have to know the whole solution, you don’t have to examine all the parameters before you take some action in a positive direction. Small steps can help you greatly to feel that you are gaining control of the situation. Play it by ear for a while, test what works and what doesn’t.

Remember to laugh. Every challenge, every misfortune has its comical side. Use humor to lighten up. Think of how comedians can describe a tragic situation in ways that make you laugh. It’s a great coping mechanism, a relaxing break from serious thinking, worrying or grieving.

Don’t neglect yourself. Take good care of your nutrition, sleep, and home environment. Create relaxation time, see friends, do things that please you, like relaxing hobbies, or going to the gym.

Maintain your vision and sense of purpose. Setbacks create havoc, sometimes, emotional upheaval and tend to require all of our attention. We tend to obsess about our problem, as if it’s the only thing going on in our lives. It’s good to continue to keep in mind your long-term personal goals, visions, the things that make your life meaningful and focus back on all these areas that provided joy, hope and a sense of accomplishment before the upsetting event. It will help create a sense of balance in your life.

Finally, remember that “this too shall pass”. Repeating this often to yourself will have a soothing and healing effect and boost your resilience.

.

Ismini Apostoli

.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 28, 2015 in WISDOM

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Resilience is one of the greatest survival skills.

.

Fall down seven times. Stand up eight. (Japanese proverb.)

 

 

Resilience is one of the greatest survival skills. It helps you both psychologically and physically in the long-run. While it can’t make your problems go away, it can help you endure any sort of hardship – like traumatic events, loss, illness, disaster, the death of a loved one, or any other setback or challenge.

Resilience is about enlisting your inner strengths, and harnessing your healthy coping mechanisms, so that you keep functioning without getting over-anxious, depressed, overwhelmed or apathetic.

Here are 8 tips to help you learn how to bounce back when some misfortune strikes, or when you are faced with a challenge:

Maintain your hopefulness. Even though the picture may look grim for now, think back to all the challenges that you have encountered and overcome in your life so far, to gain hope and optimism that a solution will be found and remember that any wound, no matter how big it seems right now, will heal in time.

Learn to be more stoical about life. Accept that unwanted events, sudden changes in circumstances are a part of life, and instead of clinging to your belief of how things “ought to be” learn to adapt, tolerate and even welcome your problems. Sometimes, problems are teachers and help us grow and become hardier and wiser.

Take some distance from the event, misfortune or challenge and try to view it as happening to someone else. How would you help that person cope? What would you advise him/her to do? Follow your own advice. There are many angles from which you can view a situation. Taking some distance, becoming an observer rather than a participant may give you the strength but also the problem-solving resources to overcome your challenge. Resilience requires flexibility, not holding onto rigidly to only one point of view.

Reach out to your friends or other support groups. You don’t have to go it alone. A friend’s advice, help or even willing ear or shoulder to cry on may help you re-organize better your inner resources. Feeling connected helps empower people in times of hardship. Offering help to others does the same. Help others in need, you will get empowered as much as they!

Take appropriate action.You don’t have to know the whole solution, you don’t have to examine all the parameters before you take some action in a positive direction. Small steps can help you greatly to feel that you are gaining control of the situation. Play it by ear for a while, test what works and what doesn’t.

Remember to laugh. Every challenge, every misfortune has its comical side. Use humor to lighten up. Think of how comedians can describe a tragic situation in ways that make you laugh. It’s a great coping mechanism, a relaxing break from serious thinking, worrying or grieving.

Don’t neglect yourself. Take good care of your nutrition, sleep, and home environment. Create relaxation time, see friends, do things that please you, like relaxing hobbies, or going to the gym.

Maintain your vision and sense of purpose. Setbacks create havoc, sometimes, emotional upheaval and tend to require all of our attention. We tend to obsess about our problem, as if it’s the only thing going on in our lives. It’s good to continue to keep in mind your long-term personal goals, visions, the things that make your life meaningful and focus back on all these areas that provided joy, hope and a sense of accomplishment before the upsetting event. It will help create a sense of balance in your life.

Finally, remember that “this too shall pass”. Repeating this often to yourself will have a soothing and healing effect and boost your resilience.

.

Ismini Apostoli

.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 24, 2014 in WISDOM

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

10 Tips for Personal Power

 

.

Being Assertive

10 Tips for Personal Power

 .

The feeling of personal power is key in all interpersonal relationships. Many people  are not very clear about what assertiveness is and how it differs from  aggressiveness. One main difference is that aggressiveness is about power over other  people, while assertiveness is about being able to assert our rights and stand up for our thoughts and feelings while respecting the rights, thoughts and feelings of  others.

 

Passive people habitually submit to other people’s dominance play, do not have clear boundaries, and are constantly being invaded by others. They tend to avoid conflict by not expressing their thoughts and feelings, avoid any sort of confrontations even when their basic rights are involved, which leaves them feeling – and being – victimized. At the same time, anger builds up in them, so when they do speak up, they tend to do it in an aggressive, attacking and blaming way rather than a constructive, solution-oriented, assertive way.

 

Aggressive people, on the other hand, attempt to impose their will on others, do not respect other people’s boundaries and are invasive and coercive. Aggressive people may get their way with some people at first, but in the long-run they alienate  others, create a lot of stress in their social, family and work environment, experience a lot of failures in all interpersonal relationships and end up having no  social support and feeling isolated and victimized themselves.

 

Somewhere in the middle stands assertiveness which is a way of communicating and behaving that respects the rights of all relationship partners. Assertiveness requires honesty, directness, self-confidence, knowing what your rights are and being able to defend them in positive, constructive ways. Learning to act more assertively will increase your sense of efficacy, of having an impact on your environment, your chances of having honest, straight-forward relationships, your chances of getting your needs met, will improve your ability to make your own decisions and get more satisfaction out of life.

 

Assertiveness is based on two important traits: relatively good self-confidence and good communication skills.

 

Self-confidence is built through our experience of effectiveness in the world. This effectiveness can be measured in many areas of experience, like academic or professional achievement, physical or athletic abilities, social and personal relationships, etc. Self-confidence is built from the inside out, meaning that we don’t expect others to provide us with self-confidence but we build it by giving ourselves credit for our strengths, virtues and accomplishments.

 

Good communication skills involve being a good listener as well being a good speaker and being able to appraise a situation in a cool-headed, non-defensive or fearful manner . Assertive communicators have developed some specific skills for standing up and speaking up for themselves. They have fewer conflicts in their dealings with others, and their needs are more frequently met, so they feel happier and more in control of life situations. Most people desiring to become more assertive start from a passive behavioral baseline and require quite a bit of practice in assertive communication skills before they can see any change in the power balance between them and other people. So start slowly in the beginning, and gradually practice more and more assertive communication skills.

 

Here are a few tips on what communication skills you need to develop and practice:

 

Maintain eye contact when you are in a conversation. This way you communicate a self-confident and honest message.

 

Be specific and direct about what you want, think or feel. Practice making statements like “I want to..”, or “I think…”. Learn to say “no”.

 

Use your body language to emphasize your words. When making a demand or a request, stand up straight and speak in a loud and clear voice.

 

Don’t get personal or over-emotional when you feel your rights are being violated.  Comment on the person’s behavior rather than attacking the person. Use “I” statements, instead of “you” statements that sound like accusations. Feel free to say, “I don’t like it when you yell at me” or “I don’t appreciate not being treated fairly”. Asserting yourself this way balances the power between you and the other person. Once you comment on the inappropriate behavior, don’t forget to request the more appropriate behavior that you would like to take its place, like, “I would like you to be on time when we have a date”.

 

Learn to reward people for positive behavior and establish a positive cooperative spirit in all interpersonal relationships.

 

Choose the right time and the right place for resolving issues, making sure that the other person is emotionally willing to start a conversation. Otherwise, whatever you have to say may be forgotten or overlooked.

 

Express your opinions honestly and do not hesitate to have a different opinion from that of other people even if those people are significant to you or in a position of authority – you still are entitled to your own opinions. “Own” your message, acknowledging that you opinion comes from your own perception of the situation, and your own frame of reference. If no agreement can be found that respects the opinion of both parties, then you can “agree to disagree” on the specific issue.

 

Practice leadership skills like making overtures to other people, offering positive suggestions to peers and colleagues in a positive, friendly, cooperative spirit, and supporting your own opinions, suggestions and proposals with clear and convincing arguments.

 

Ask for feedback. Encourage others to be clear, direct and specific in their feedback to you. This way, many misunderstandings in the conversation can be easily resolved and you also convey the message that you equally respect the opinion, feelings and rights of others as much as you respect your own.

 

Reward yourself every time you manage to overcome your fears and habitual passive reactions and are able to formulate an assertive response, regardless of its effect on the other person or the situation.

 

The important thing is that you keep practicing and reinforcing your assertive communication skills, rather than your initial effectiveness. It may be a new way of communicating for you, so it may take some time before it feels natural, but the more you practice your assertive communication skills, the more confidence you will gain and you will find out that not only is it really easy, but it’s also very effective.

  

Ismini Apostoli

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 7, 2014 in WISDOM

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Your sense of balance and well-being are your responsibility.

Self-Help Tips for Improving Your Mood

.

Decide once and for all that your mood, your sense of balance and well-being are your responsibility.

Decide that you are precious to yourself and that you are in charge of treating yourself wellBE YOUR OWN BEST FRIEND.

Decide that you love and honor yourself and repeat this as often as you need during the day.

Decide that every day your first and foremost concern is to help yourself feel a little better, no matter how you have woken up that morning or how you may feel at certain moments during the day.

When you are in a good mood, make a list of the things that please you and make you feel good; refer to your list when you feel down and do one or more of those things.

When you are in a good mood, make a list of people, activities, places, images, experiences, memories that ordinarily make you feel good, refer to your list when you feel down and focus for a few minutes on those uplifting thoughts.

Even if you are at home alone, treat yourself with respect. Do not lounge around in your pajamas, unkempt, unshaven, etc. Act as if you are expecting someone and be presentable. It will help greatly when you happen to look at yourself in the mirror.

Take care of your environment. Make it as tidy and comfortable as you can. Throw away old newspapers, magazines, junk mail, put your clothes away in your closet, make your bed, make your home an inviting place for you.

If you live alone, having something alive like a plant or a pet really does help you feel that you have some company, and something to go home to. Buy some plants and decorate your home, and consider getting a pet. Even a goldfish is good enough.

Call a friend, or write to a friend. Invite a friend to your home, or to do something together. Have something specific in mind, like going to a movie, or out to dinner, or for drinks.

REACH OUT

If no friend is available and you are feeling bored and frustrated, take yourself out to a movie, or to dinner, or for a drink. A lot of people feel self-conscious about going out alone. Remember that you are in charge of your feelings and feel proud instead that you are doing something good for yourself. DARE!

Go out for a walk, or a drive. Go on, don’t be lazy, don’t put it off, get out of the house and you will certainly be rewarded by the improvement in your mood.

GET IN TOUCH WITH NATURE. As often as you can, visit parks, places with greenery, take short holidays or daytrips and get in touch with nature. Enjoy the sounds, the smells, the sights, awaken your senses.

Attend a lecture.

Go to an art gallery.

Go to the theater and watch a great performance.

Play your favorite music, and make sure it’s your favorite uplifting music.

Take a long, luxurious bubble-bath.

Buy yourself a present, yes, go on, splurge, buy something you have been wanting for a long time.

Read an inspiring book, read some poetry, or go out and buy some new books.

Cook a gourmet dinner for yourself. Invite someone to share it.

Exercise. Doing even some simple exercises at home, by focusing on and energizing your body, you will immediately feel the improvement in your mood.Use your body, awaken your body, enliven your body and your mood will lift. Do some gardening, or some serious housecleaning!

Meditate. You don’t have to use any complicated procedures. Just decide to take a break from the negative self-talk going on in your mind. Sit quietly, focus on your breath, tell yourself to relax, and when you do feel completely relaxed lose yourself in a beautiful, relaxing scene like a serene pool, a lush forest, a beautiful beach and stay there as long as you like.

Distract yourself from the condition, topic, person, situation, event that has brought you down. Your first priority is always your balance, your peace of mind.

Avoid dwelling on past hurts and grievances, avoid painting a grim and gloomy picture of the totality of your life. Focus on the present, focus on yourself now, focus only on improving your mood now.

Find things to be thankful for, things to appreciate in yourself, your environment, your job, your friends, your family, your neighborhood, your city.

End each day by remembering to think good, loving thoughts for yourself. Make sure you fall asleep in a sweet mood. This will ensure that you will have pleasant dreams and wake up next morning in a much better mood.

Ismini Apostoli

.

Beat the blues! BE YOUR OWN BEST FRIEND.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 1, 2014 in WISDOM

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Self-Help Tips for Improving Your Mood

 

 

Self-Help Tips for Improving Your Mood

 

Decide once and for all that your mood, your sense of balance and well-being are your responsibility.

Decide that you are precious to yourself and that you are in charge of treating yourself wellBE YOUR OWN BEST FRIEND.

Decide that you love and honor yourself and repeat this as often as you need during the day.

Decide that every day your first and foremost concern is to help yourself feel a little better, no matter how you have woken up that morning or how you may feel at certain moments during the day.

When you are in a good mood, make a list of the things that please you and make you feel good; refer to your list when you feel down and do one or more of those things.

When you are in a good mood, make a list of people, activities, places, images, experiences, memories that ordinarily make you feel good, refer to your list when you feel down and focus for a few minutes on those uplifting thoughts.

Even if you are at home alone, treat yourself with respect. Do not lounge around in your pajamas, unkempt, unshaven, etc. Act as if you are expecting someone and be presentable. It will help greatly when you happen to look at yourself in the mirror.

Take care of your environment. Make it as tidy and comfortable as you can. Throw away old newspapers, magazines, junk mail, put your clothes away in your closet, make your bed, make your home an inviting place for you.

If you live alone, having something alive like a plant or a pet really does help you feel that you have some company, and something to go home to. Buy some plants and decorate your home, and consider getting a pet. Even a goldfish is good enough.

Call a friend, or write to a friend. Invite a friend to your home, or to do something together. Have something specific in mind, like going to a movie, or out to dinner, or for drinks. REACH OUT.

If no friend is available and you are feeling bored and frustrated, take yourself out to a movie, or to dinner, or for a drink. A lot of people feel self-conscious about going out alone. Remember that you are in charge of your feelings and feel proud instead that you are doing something good for yourself. DARE!

Go out for a walk, or a drive. Go on, don’t be lazy, don’t put it off, get out of the house and you will certainly be rewarded by the improvement in your mood.

GET IN TOUCH WITH NATURE. As often as you can, visit parks, places with greenery, take short holidays or daytrips and get in touch with nature. Enjoy the sounds, the smells, the sights, awaken your senses.

Attend a lecture.

Go to an art gallery.

Go to the theater and watch a great performance.

Play your favorite music, and make sure it’s your favorite uplifting music.

Take a long, luxurious bubble-bath.

Buy yourself a present, yes, go on, splurge, buy something you have been wanting for a long time.

Read an inspiring book, read some poetry, or go out and buy some new books.

Cook a gourmet dinner for yourself. Invite someone to share it.

Exercise. Doing even some simple exercises at home, by focusing on and energizing your body, you will immediately feel the improvement in your mood.Use your body, awaken your body, enliven your body and your mood will lift. Do some gardening, or some serious housecleaning!

Meditate. You don’t have to use any complicated procedures. Just decide to take a break from the negative self-talk going on in your mind. Sit quietly, focus on your breath, tell yourself to relax, and when you do feel completely relaxed lose yourself in a beautiful, relaxing scene like a serene pool, a lush forest, a beautiful beach and stay there as long as you like.

Distract yourself from the condition, topic, person, situation, event that has brought you down. Your first priority is always your balance, your peace of mind.

Avoid dwelling on past hurts and grievances, avoid painting a grim and gloomy picture of the totality of your life. Focus on the present, focus on yourself now, focus only on improving your mood now.

Find things to be thankful for, things to appreciate in yourself, your environment, your job, your friends, your family, your neighborhood, your city.

End each day by remembering to think good, loving thoughts for yourself. Make sure you fall asleep in a sweet mood. This will ensure that you will have pleasant dreams and wake up next morning in a much better mood.

by Ismini Apostoli

.

Beat the blues! BE YOUR OWN BEST FRIEND.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on December 25, 2013 in WISDOM

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Without a well developed/strong WILLPOWER you have almost no chance of success.

In the smart restaurant of a very smart hotel in the West End of London, Roy F Baumeister, eminent American social psychology professor, orders a lunch of fish and chips, and then decides not to eat the chips. “I won’t eat something that’s not good for me unless it’s absolutely perfect, and it’s going to give me real pleasure,” he says. “I’m afraid… Well, it just didn’t look like these were going to do either.”

What willpower, you might say. You’d be right; the chips looked pretty good. But Baumeister is also, coincidentally, a leading authority on that very subject, and has just published a smash-hit book on it with New York Times science writer John Tierney.

Willpower: Rediscovering Our Greatest Strength distils three decades of academic research (Baumeister’s contribution) into self-control and willpower, which the Florida State University social psychologist bluntly identifies as “the key to success and a happy life”.

The result is also (Tierney’s contribution) readable, accessible and practical. It’s an unusual self-help book, in fact, in that it offers not just advice, tips and insights to help develop, conserve and boost willpower, but grounds them in some science.

Willpower is, Baumeister argues over lunch, “what separates us from the animals. It’s the capacity to restrain our impulses, resist temptation – do what’s right and good for us in the long run, not what we want to do right now. It’s central, in fact, to civilisation.”

The disciplined and dutiful Victorians, all stiff upper lip and lashings of moral fibre, had willpower in spades; as, sadly, did the Nazis, who referred to their evil adventure as the “triumph of will”. In the 60s we thought otherwise: let it all hang out; if it feels good, do it; I’m OK, you’re OK.

But without willpower, it seems, we’re actually rarely OK. In the 60s a sociologist called Walter Mischel was interested in how young children resist instant gratification; he offered them the choice of a marshmallow now, or two if they could wait 15 minutes. Years later, he tracked some of the kids down, and made a startling discovery.

Mischel’s findings have recently been confirmed by a remarkable long-term study in New Zealand, concluded in 2010. For 32 years, starting at birth, a team of international researchers tracked 1,000 people, rating their observed and reported self-control and willpower in a different ways.

What they found was that, even taking into account differences of intelligence, race and social class, those with high self-control – those who, in Mischel’s experiment, held out for two marshmallows later – grew into healthier, happier and wealthier adults.

Those with low willpower, the study discovered, fared less well academically. They were more likely to be in low-paying jobs with few savings, to be overweight, to have drug or alcohol problems, and to have difficulty maintaining stable relationships (many were single parents). They were also nearly four times more likely to have a criminal conviction. “Willpower,” concludes Baumeister, “is one of the most important predictors of success in life.”

How to Improve Your Willpower

So how can we improve ours? Baumeister’s big idea, now borne out by hundreds of ingenious experiments in his and other social psychologists’ labs, is that willpower – the force by which we control and manage our thoughts, impulses and emotions and which helps us persevere with difficult tasks – is actually rather like a kind of moral muscle.

Like a muscle, it can get tired if you overuse it. Exercising willpower, but also making decisions and choices and taking initiatives, all seem to draw on the same well of energy, Baumeister has established. In experiments, he found that straight after accomplishing a task that required them to restrain their impulses (saying no to chocolate biscuits, suppressing their emotions while watching a three-tissue weepy), students were far more likely to underperform at other willpower-related jobs such as squeezing a handgrip or solving a difficult puzzle.

“The immune system also dips into the same pot, which is big, but finite,” says Baumeister, “and, we are pretty sure, so does women’s premenstrual syndrome. Having a cold tends to reduce your self-control, and PMS does the same. We get cranky and irritable, but it’s not that we have nastier impulses – it’s that our usual restraints have become weakened.”

So best avoid trying to do too many things involving mental effort at the same time, or if you’re ill. As with a muscle, though, you can train your willpower. Even small, day-to-day acts of willpower such as maintaining good posture, speaking in complete sentences or using a computer mouse with the other hand, can pay off by reinforcing longer-term self-control in completely unrelated activities, Baumeister has found. People previously told to sit or stand up straight whenever they remembered later performed much better in lab willpower tests.

The final way in which willpower resembles a mental “muscle” is that when its strength is depleted, it can be revived with glucose. Getting a decent night’s sleep and eating well – good, slow-burning fuel – is important in the exercise of willpower, but in times of dire need a quick shot of sugar can, according to Baumeister’s lab tests, make all the difference.

(This is, of course, something of a problem for crash dieters, who basically need to eat in order to summon up the willpower not to eat. Indeed some very strong impulses, such as the behaviour often exhibited by males in possession of an erect penis, can sometimes prove completely resistant to willpower, even after the ingestion of a can of Coca-Cola.)

Baumeister cites a “very impressive demonstration” of the glucose argument: in a study published last year, researchers found that Israeli judges making the difficult and sensitive decision of whether or not to grant parole opted to do so in roughly 65% of cases after lunch, and hardly ever just before.

Build Up Willpower by Exercising It

Baumeister’s top willpower tips: Build up your self-control by exercising it regularly in small ways. Learn to recognise signs that your willpower may be waning. Don’t crash diet. Don’t try to do too much at once. Establish good habits and routines that will take the strain off your willpower. Learn how to draw up an effective to-do list.

Don’t put yourself in temptation’s way, or if you can’t avoid it, make it harder for yourself to succumb. Use your willpower actively: plan, commit, and do so (like members of religious communities) publicly. “People with low willpower,” Baumeister says, “use it to get themselves out of crises. People with high willpower use it not to get themselves into crises.”

By Jon Henley/ Source: The Guardian

 

 

 

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 11, 2013 in WISDOM

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Here are a few tips about discussing sexuality with your kids.

Here are a few tips about discussing sexuality with your kids, and a few things you should know

  1. When is the right time to discuss sex with your kids? Truth is, it’s never too soon. Body parts and all. If a child learns to be ashamed of their body, this can lead to body image issues later in life. Or even shame around sexuality.

  2. Be positive about all bodily functions. Meaning, when you’re changing a diaper, don’t say “OMG, that stinks!” There’s nothing to be ashamed of about something that’s just a part of every day life. It sends a bad signal

  3. If you catch your kid in what a professional would call, “self-stimulation,” DO NOT push their hand away or punish them for their exploration. I actually caught my boy exploring once, and my comment to him was, “That’s normal behavior, but it’s private behavior, so if you want to continue, you’ll have to go into your room for that, buddy.” You know what he did? He got up, walked out, went into his room, and slammed the door! Not a word of a lie! That’s my boy! He was 3. But seriously, don’t make your child feel this is shameful behavior.

  4. How does a baby get in your tummy? A good answer would be to explain that when a man and woman love each other, and get married (yes you may say that or not), the man puts his penis in a woman’s vagina, and his sperm fertilizes her egg, and a baby then grows. WWWWWHHHOOOOOO!!! Screeching breaks!!! But really, you could absolutely say this. However, a suggested age is not before grade 2-4. So, I say, use your judgement and go accordingly. That may be over-share for some. But if they ask you to confirm it as truth, then you have the right to confirm that.

  5. And finally, be open and available. Let them know that whatever questions they have, no matter how private, or how silly it may seem, you are ALWAYS there to listen. Remember, you don’t want your kids learning about sex from someone else. Let it come from you. Shake off the worries, and get talking. And please, MONITOR THEIR WEB SURFING BEHAVIOR. This is a biggie.

http://womenonthefence.com/2010/04/30/lets-talk-about-sex-baby/

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 21, 2013 in WISDOM

 

Tags: , , , , ,

 
Mightyman Vukeya

DNS is in my DNA

Chris Brake Show Podcast

LIVE! Every Wednesday @ 8pm Eastern / 7pm Central on StrangeLabel.com

wqp88888

Just another WordPress.com site

Digital Media

Join me here on my crazy techincal journey! Disasters will occur

Incognito

Just another WordPress.com site

Lama Surya Das

Lama Surya Das, the most highly trained American lama in the Tibetan tradition.

My Life as an Artist (2)

Smile! You’re at the best WordPress.com site ever

juliesiteblogdotcom1

A great WordPress.com site

Joseph Matheny : ars est celare artem

Reality Hacker | Artisanal Legend Crafter | Feral Scholar | Collarless Dog | Gamecaller | Mytho-Poetic Bricoleur | Labyrinthos Mythologicus Architect | Transgressive Storyteller | Caput Gerat Lupinum

My Story of Organized Crime, Organized Stalking, Public/Political Corruption and Domestic Terrorism

Over a decade of organized stalking, extortion, schemes to defraud, racketeering/murder in aid thereof, in colossal proportion.

dianetot's Blog

its all about life,love,passion,desires,truth

BEYOND

Parapsychology is what's beyond the humans and metaphysics is what's beyond nature, and both define the same thing... God.

Michelduchaine

Défenseur de la Terre/Defender of the Earth

Hathor Rabiah

A new name. A new city. A new life.

Opening Duirs

SOCIAL ENGINEERING AND PROGRAMMING

Cracked

The Chocolately, Nutty, Interior of my life and Psychology

Celestial Elf, a2ndLook~

Perceptions 0f Reflections ((a backup blog for http://celestialelfdanceoflife.blogspot.com/))...

Cindi Gale

To every thing there is a season ~

The Sting Of The Scorpion Blog (T.S.O.T.S.B.)

.......................Because Everything Else Just Bites!

Poetry Inspector

Favorites from around the Web

Los Sentidos De La Vida

Un Blog de Cine, Musica, Vinos... En 75 palabras aprox.

My Time is Now

Dancing With The Elderly- A Hollywood Actress's Day Job

let the free birds fly

surviving creating instigating

Qubethink

Permutate

AshiAkira's Blog

Just another WordPress.com site

Delilah

Yes I cut Samson's hair, he was an asshole.

diary of a single mom in the south

my life, my love, my story

My Hong Kong Husband

Third culture wife: Polish girl married to a Hongkonger, fresh off the airplane in Ireland. AMWF, lifestyle, culture, food, Asian fashion and a little bit of Cantonese

Dean J. Baker - Poetry, and prose poems

My books: https://www.amazon.com/Dean-J.-Baker/e/B00IC6PGQM

Loving Without Boundaries

A Modern Look At Practicing Polyamory / Ethical Non-monogamy

Gorgeous

Ramblings from a disturbed mind ©2013 Cho Wan Yau

Middle-Aged Martial Arts Mom

Loving a crippling compulsion....

lovinchelle

LIVING LIFE AND TAKING PICS ALONG THE WAY.

Just me being curious

A blog of questions and few answers.

I Dont Want To Talk About It

The Ultimate Paradox: Depression in Sobriety

Shepherd Mulwanda

ICT Research Training and Consultancy,Agriculture & the Youths

Don Charisma

because anything is possible with Charisma

White Shadows

Story of a white pearl that turned to ashes while waiting for a pheonix to be born inside her !

GIFT FROM THE HEART - Share and Care!

Appreciation, Respect and Gratitude towards all...... that there is!

dancingwithanother

Trying to make sense of turmoil

Dince's Chronicles

My Personal Blog

Awareness It Self

Quotes for spiritual enjoyment

dliwcanis

Esoterically Eccentric

Doug Does Life

A Creative Monkey On How To Find Your Path In Life.

Never Quite Broken

What you did not build up, you cannot tear down.

%d bloggers like this: